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as an m.a. i worked as an advisor to the israeli administration to the u.n. arafat speaking for the general assembly. very tumultuous period. i moved to israel and tried for this unit in the army. the tryouts are rather rigorous. i did 17 months of basic training. and got out just prior to the lebanon war. but in israel, we have -- you serve for a long period your regular serve and do reserve service to the age of 52. now i have a son in the army who is 19. and in a very elite unit. i am still doing reserve duty. we share uniforms. very bizarre. >> how old are you now? >> i'm 47. >> you can be called up at any time? >> i have been. i served in the latest intifada. in a combat role. >> where? >> in nablus. >> full combat uniform? >> i'm supposed to be semiretired. you stop jumping in the israeli army in the paratroopers at age 37 and cease being a combat soldier at age 42. at 42, 43, i was asked to stay on as an advisor on media relations. why not? sounds interesting. get good briefings. when the fighting broke out in the west bank, they asked any of the media advisors if the
into it. it's a long story, but stay with us. on tuesday the senate rejected a u.n. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. 125 other countries ratified this, but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving the treaty five votes short of ratification. what we learned today that's interesting is some of these same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support very publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip-flopper and kay bailey hutchinson of texas and senator jerry moran of kansas. we asked them all to come on the program and they declined. they're silent on this. senator moran was a co-sponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty. he even put a press release back in may proclaiming his support. here he is with bob dole in june. dole, a war veteran, former republican senate leader is a long-time supporter of disability rights and a strong advocate of this treaty. just before tuesday's vote he came to the senate chamber 89 years old frail in his wheelchair. he thought it was tha
is up and which way is down, these men have been bipartisan leaders together on this treaty. the u.n. convention on the rights of persons with disabilities has united the seemingly un-unitable. the vote was scheduled today. ratifying a treaty requires 66 yea votes. former senator bob dole was there at the senate for the occasion. in his wheelchair. the decorated wounded combat veteran, the former republican presidential nominee on the floor of the senate. he was there with his wife. so senators had to walk past him in his wheelchair on the way in to vote. and the republicans in the senate voted no. the treaty got 61 votes, but you need a super majority to ratify a treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. it requires nothing of us. 38 republicans voted no. so it failed. forget republican president, john mccain, war hero, bob dole in his wheelchair in the senate, forget our wounded veterans in their wheelchairs, forget them all. republicans are going with rick santorum and the black helicopter theory instead. now this year in 2012. they did that today. amazing. joining u
with the -- with what happened in congress yesterday, the lack of support in the united states senate for the u.n. but the u.n. process really has to go forward and has to be the leader on syria. >> i just don't think it's helpful to americans when so many senior politicians trash the u.n. you know? it's the united nations. and actually, it's better for america. >> absolutely. >> the united nations takes a lot of the work on the ground in these places. >> you're absolutely right. but there's human rights abuses that are exploding all over the world. and one that we're working very hard on right now is in uganda. there's anti-homosexuality bill that would make homosexual acts punishment by the death penalty. >> completely outrageous. >> it is. and the speaker of the house there said she's going to deliver this bill as a christmas present. so, we have 2 1/2 weeks to stop that bill right now. >> imagine. it's disgusting, isn't it? >> it certainly is. as people across this state, we're in new york state. you don't need a passport to work on human rights. right here, we're working on the farm workers
and not in syria? a lot of people asked me, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. i think from the administration's point of view they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq-type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out of syria while senators mccain and lieberman said thursday that the u.s. must get involved. what is the fear if the u.s. does get involved? >> well, precisely that. that they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talking about putting american boots on the ground or any other boots on the ground. the question is, can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most sort of seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women and children have been slaughtered and after nearly
santorum led the charge against the u.n. treaty and brought his 4-year-old disabled daughter bella to the events and warned it threatened american sovereignty and allow the u.n. to make decisions about disabled children in america. that is not true. here's what senator john kerry said last night. >> well, i have great respect for both rick and his wife karen and their daughter and their family. he's a strong family man. but he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it or he was just not factual in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything other this treaty. nothing. >> well, as we told you last night former republican, repeat, republican attorney general testified before the senate foreign relations committee in july basically saying exactly that. there's no nothing in the treaty that interferes with u.s. laws. that didn't stop senator santorum to send out this e-mail. you did it. you
. >> mr. president, i rise in opposition to the ratification of the u.n. convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. this i understand it's a sensitive topic, one about which many of my constituents on both sides of the issue have strong feelings. certainly most of us that not all of us have a family member or friend with a disability and all of us live in a society that includes the disabled is highly valued members of our communities. i've heard from advocacy groups listing of people who hope and believe that this treaty will protect disabled americans as they travel abroad in mexico about go about their lives. but i've also heard from parents of disabled children who are concerned that this treaty and adherence to the best interests of the child standard and article vii will threaten their rights as parents to determine the best education treatment and care for their disabled children. proponents of the treaty will dismiss those concerns as myth. i simply cannot support a treaty that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constantly made for
to put a satellite into orbit. right now the u.n. security council is meeting behind closed doors to discuss a response. in the meantime a lot of talk happening in d.c. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at the pentagon with more on this. so far, what is the reaction? >> reporter: we heard from u.s. officials, they are calling this very highly provocative act. it has been a swift response. we have a statement from national security council spokesman tommy vitter. he said, quote, this action is yet another example of north korea's pattern of irresponsible behavior. the united states remains vigilant in the face of north korean provocations and fully committed to the security of our allies in the region, devoting scarce resources to the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons has not brought north korea security and skaept tans by the international community and never will. jenna, as you mentioned the u.n. security council is meeting as we speak behind closed doors. the north koreans have very little to fear in terms of serious sanctions as a resu
to be a clear and credible response. what should that be? >> well, we have a very strong resolution before the u.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hu
failed to pass a u.n. disability treaty by just five votes. combat veterans like senators john mccain and john kerry delivered impassioned speeches, but dissenting voters said the treaty could pose a threat to national sovereignty. this is a stretch. more than 150 countries have signed the treaty designed to create unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wounded veterans, mccain and others, and the wounded warriors. the chamber of commerce. this is basic
that and also said that he was going to, was supporting a u.n. treaty on arms, which just hours after he was elected and at the united nations signed and that dnot rep and bear arms and the united states would be signing on to a worldwide treaty with countries like syria and iran, in which would water down our right to bare arms. >> i noticed there was a spike in gun sales after the election, why is that? >> well, because of those things and president obama's history and the first term of regulations and executive orders, things like that to try to restrict guns, so, people are want to get guns and may be restricted and worried about government having guns and they reported that black friday was the single biggest sale of firearms in the history this have country and november was the single biggest for gun sales. >> mike: over the last 11 months in this country a new study came out. 2.5 million times in in country over the last 11 months, crimes have been prevented because of guns. >> where does the anti-gun group get it wrong? >> it was exactly, bob costas said. i think he actually sai
sclinten a powder keg of instability in the region and beyond. the u.n. security council will likely vote authorizing a military intervention. similar african led super vention have provided a model for multilateral and regionly led solutions that allow the united states and our allies to provide operational support without putting boots on the ground. this will take time and stability cannot be restored through military action alone. the situation in malli is as much a crisis of governance as of security. the long running grievances between the north and the south must be addressed through diplomacy, rebuilding democratic institutions the restoration of democratically elected government. any agreement that tends to peel off groups aligned will require a credible government to do so. elections are the key to not only resolving and restoring now frozen assistance but reclaiming government control of the north and restoring the nearly three decade long history of democracy. the challenges cannot be addressed as separate issues as the recent report suggested. the international community must
. former u.n. ambassador john bolton faced similar criticism when he was up for his post, and he joins us next on whether he thinks wintour, infamously portrayed loosely in the film "the devil wears prada" has what it takes. >> oh, good morning, miranda. >> get me isaac. i don't see my breakfast here. where are my eggs? where's the piece of paper i had in my hand yesterday morning? the girls need a surfboard or spring break. nothing melts away the cold like a hot, delicious bowl of chicken noodle soup from campbell's. ♪ let it snow, let it snow ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. ♪ >> so you don't read runway? >> no. >> and before today, you had never heard of me -- >> no. >> and you have no style or sense of fashion. >> i think that depends on what your -- >> no, no, that wasn't a question. [laughter] megyn: well, the woman on whom the hit film "the devil wears prada" was reportedly based is back in the news today, and even the subject of the white house press briefing as n
of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read very briefly from the report that the u.n. special rapporteur for iran files with the u.s. assembly september 20th 11 in the repertoire highlighted a pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special rapporteur on human rights for for several years now. september 2011 the u.n. general submitted a report in which he said he was deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions come amputations, arbitrary arrest and detention, unfair trials, torture and ill-treatment in a crackdown on human rights activists, lawyers, an opposition that exists. just to draw one prefix ample from the weeks news, there is actually a guess what qualifies in iran briefly is good news, a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49 day hunger strike on december 4th. her name is nazarene to show day. she has been imprisoned in prison since 20 tenanted machine had imposed a travel ban on her has been an-year-old daughter, sushi was on a hunger strike for 49 days and has actually stopped the hunger s
and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported strongly the position that the united states took on libya because there was an identifiable enemy, and
, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia? and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what's happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. but i think from the administration's point of view, they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out syria, while senator mccain said they need to get involved. what is at stake? >> they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talk about putting american boots on the ground. the question is can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women, and children have been slaughtered and after nearly two years of this administration saying, you know, the assad must step down, and it not happening. the best one can hope for, perhaps, is that some kin
headlines are topping the world. the u.n. warned north korea to cancel the launch amid belief it is a cover. >> president morsi will give up the dictator like powers says little tension. protestors gathering in the streets of cairo over the weekend marching on the presidential ball lass. in guatemala where millionaire john mc af fee is speaking out at jail. >> i would be ap pee to go to england or america. america is my home. >> he is fighting deportation back where he is wanted for questioning in the death of his neighbor. he is working to get back to the u.s. and return to a normal life. >> 17 minutes before the hour. despite being trillions in the hole a lot of us haven't learned our lesson. we are more in debt than we have been ever before due to big borrowing in the month of october. we have that story. >> hey there diane. the federal reserve says they increase borrowing $14.2 million hitting a record $2.75 trillions in debt. borrowing on credit cards rose 3.4 billion the second mofrntnt increase in the past 10 months. while borrowing was up for the month consumer spending was down par
by the plo which recently after four years of not negotiating with the us rail ris went to the u.n. and asked for upgraded status. do the israelis have anyone to negotiability a peace process with at this point, and if they didn't negotiate, and let's suppose that abbas came tomorrow to negotiate these process after four years of refusing to do so without concessions in advance, could he sign a pape or that would be at all -- a paper that would be at all meaningful? would he be able to bring hamas into it which is dedicate today the extermination of israel? is there any way to believe that israel could have a separate peace or have peace for the -- before the rest of the world settles this mess with islamism? >> well, it's possible, but it's very hard at this point to imagine. it would not come easily for all the questions, for all the reasons that your questions embody. i mean, in the first place, um, right now israel faces a palestinian people that are divided between two governments. so making peace with one wouldn't give them the security or the confidence to take the risks that they will
.s. assistance to undercut, must not continue to undercut our key interest in the region. second, the u.n. should consider initiating security cooperation to linwood training and intelligence sharing with heavily vetted opposition groups that are committed to the space process and universally accepted human rights and human rights principles. i understand organizations like the syrian support could have developed criteria and secure commitments from commanders on the ground to abide by the internationally accepted human rights norms and conventions relative to the behavior during armed conflict. we should make sure that if we take this step we ensure that that happens. third of the u.s. should consider measures that would hamper the ability of the syrian air force to conduct aerial attacks on civilians. the finalize the patriot missile batteries which is an important step in the right direction. while defensive in nature of things that these batteries are an important display of international solidarity with turkey and the syrian people. the administration should also examine and assess other way
conference in ireland. the special u.n. envoy to syria was at the meeting said they agreed to seek a, quote, creative solution to the syrian crisis. jim miklaszewski joins us with the latest. let's talk about the information that nbc reported regarding the syrian military and its actions right now. >> to be clear the precursor of chemicals or at least a couple that actually when combined chemically create that deadly nerve gas. we've been told by u.s. sources those precursor chemicals have been preloaded now into aerial bombs that could be dropped from the fighter bombers onto the syrian people. as of this afternoon there is still no indication that the syrians have actually put -- attempted to put those weapons on aircraft or that there's been a final fatal order from president assad to carry out any kind of attack. so it appears right now that they are in at least the preparation mode, but they're really just one step away from actually carrying out those chemical weapons attacks. we heard secretary panetta say today that the latest intelligence on what's going on with those chemical weap
. why the senate would vote down a u.n. treaty to support universal rights for the disabled. but they did, 38 senators voted no. some of the so-called facts about the treaty are simply fabrications. ahead on the program, pretty spirited discussion. i interview one of the senators who voted no. senator mike lee. i confront him about those facts. also former u.s. attorney general dick thornburg, a republican, who has a disabled child and still holds out hope the treaty will pass. >>> plus, a legal battle to tell you about over 21-month-old child named talia. her mother gave her up for adoption without the father's knowledge or permission while he was away from home serving in the military. now he wants talia back. the child's fate hinges on a judge's decision. we'll tell you how the why you ruled and speak with talia's dad. those stories and landmark cases making it to the supreme court. it will decide the issue of same sex marriage. all that ahead along with the "ridiculist." >> "360" coming up in ten minutes. >>> our fifth story "outfront" tragedy in london. a nurse at the h
humanitarian aid and other non- military support. the u.n. now estimates that half a million syrians have fled to neighboring countries with two million more displaced within syria itself. >> ifill: for more on the syrian political opposition i'm joined now by murhaf joujati, professor of middle east studies at the national defense university and a former member of the syrian national council, the last major syrian political opposition group. and fred hof, who served as secretary of state clinton's special adviser for the syrian transition until last september. he is now a senior fellow at the atlantic council. ambassador hof, i want to start with you. how significant is what the president said yesterday about this recognition? >> gwen, first of all, i'm delighted to be here. i think what the president had to say was extraordinarily significant. we're coming to the point now where we may be at or very close to a tipping point in syria. where the assad regime may be in serious jeopardy of going down. nevertheless, there are still millions, literally millions, of syrians on the fence. they have
's very hard to say when it is then his regime will collapse. host: the secretary general of the u.n., anders rasmussen, said that "it would be completely unacceptable for the whole international community and if anyone resort to these terrible weapons, i would expect an immediate reaction from the international community." what would that reaction be? guest: military intervention. we have heard very strong warnings. the words of not been directly spelled out, it's likely that is exactly what would need to happen. host: led by the u.s. or another nation? guest: the u.s. would clearly playing a leading role. host: front page of a "the new york times." the story points out the loan syrian rebel group with the stamp of approval from all qaeda has become one of the most effective fighting forces was a stark challenge to the u.s. and other countries. explain. guest: this is a longstanding concern and one reason why the obama administration has said they're not interested in sending sophisticated weapons and to syria. the organization referred to in the article is considered one of the mos
or not senators mccain and others are upset at the president. if you look at her u.n. record and, more importantly, her state department record, senator albright was furious with her and put her on probation. she has a terrible record among professional diplomats in the same -- i don't know if she was a terrible desk officer from ethiopia, genocide, which is the president says is one of his greatest regrets or mistakes, those were all on his watch. if she did such a terrible job there, how can she be a secretary? >> the president has been able to rehash that old garbage that mary is talking about. they have not done so now. they are talking about trumped-up charges and old regrets and on issues that, you know, would come out in a nomination hearing if she is nominated but i would just say, as an ambassador to the u.n., she's done an excellent job. she's served our country well and president obama ought to be able to make the choice based on who he wants as secretary of state. >> president clinton has told me on several occasions, mary and hilary, his greatest regret as far as being a president on
to search for survivors. and just to get a sense of the scope of the damage. the u.n. is asking for 65 million in international aid. >>> the prachk phonk phone call revealed information about the duchess of cambridge may have led to the death of the nurse. they are going to donate $500,000 to the deceased woman's family. she committed suicide after she let the hoax call go through the ward where the duchess was staying. an autopsy on her will be carried out today. she was married and had two children. >>> after four days of testing authorities reveal why nelson mandela is in the hospital and house serious his condition is. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? can your moisturizer do that? [ female announcer ] dermatologist recommended avee
made it very clear at the u.n. general assembly where the israeli red line is. but there is an argument that there is no american red line, there is an american invisible line, and no one is sure where it is. not the iranians, not us, not the israelis. do you share that concern? is there anything we can do to establish a more conclusive and defined redline so that it helps us in our negotiating strategy with the iranians? as we were reminded this morning, persians negotiate in the bazaar. do we have an america that we can more clearly defined -- american red line that we can more clearly define? >> there are a couple of reasons by the military threat is important. as sandy indicated, the iranians to respond to credible threats of force. -- do respond to credible threats of force. if you read the biographies of the hostage-takers, they said they were afraid ronald reagan was going to act like a cowboy. the release the hostages the minute he was sworn in. the soviets threatened to bomb tehran, and the hostages were let go. it is important to note that the iran-iraq war came to win and win
rights abuses in iran. i would just read briefly from the report that the u.n. special wrote and file to the u.n. general assembly in september of 2011 when there was a pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special representative on human rights. in september, 2011, the un secretary-general submitted a report to the general assembly in which he said he was "deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions, amputations, arbitrary arrests and detentions, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment and bemoaned the crackdown on human rights activists, lawyers, journalists, and opposite -- and opposition activists." one example from the week's news -- there was what qualifies in iran as a some good news -- a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49-day hunger strike on december four. she has been imprisoned since 2010 and the regime had imposed a travel ban on her husband and 12-year-old daughter. she was on a hunger strike for 49 days and has actually stopped of thunderstrike amid an indication that the regime will lif
, moscow's support in places like the u.n. security council, the iranians are very worried about upsetting russia's interests in the south caucuses. this is best reflected by iran's position in regards to armenia and georgia where russian interests are strongest. i have provided more detail in my testimony and provided some examples. second, i think we have a failure in tehran's so-called big brother approach which i think is heavily tainted with an ideological syndrome. so i would quickly say it's not just that iran doesn't want to be active in the south caucuses because it fears that the russians might be upset, but it's also because of a failure of its model as a political invitation that is extended over the last 20 years to these three countries, particularly azerbaijan. where russian interests are least sensitive n my view, iran has also failed to gain traction. this is thanks to -- excuse me. where iran has basically insisted on sharing its anti-american and aunt-western portions, and this is a call which the authorities in azerbaijan have repeatedly rejected, i think they would hav
.s. consulate in libya. >> when they go after the u.n. ambassador because they think she's an easy target, then they have a problem with me. >> senator mccain. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> senator john mccain jockingly gave the cabinet post nod to democrat john kerry. >> i think jeong kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> kerry is also listed as a potential defense secretary to replace leon panetta. it's a list that includes michelle fornoy with the number three job at the pentagon. ashton carter is on the list and former nebraska senator chuck hagel on a republican could represent a reach across the aisle. >> we're in a much stronger position today as a country than we were in '07. >> treasury secretary tim geithner has said he will stay at his post until at least inauguration. his chief of stat jack lieu is named as an replace am. they skwed if people thought president obama would pick good cabinet members. 58% said they thought he would, 42% said he would not. emily schmidt, cnn, washington. >>> one cabinet member on th
. >> that me ask you this. made very clear, the u.n. general assembly, where the israeli red line is. spring or summer 2,030. and there is an argument that there is no american red line. the american invisible line. in those really show where it is. now the iranians are us. do you share that concern? is there anything we can do to establish a more conclusive, defined redline so that you actually help us and are negotiating strategy? as we were reminded this morning , the persians find out and initiate. tough negotiators. they understand, but it's hard to negotiate a round brinkmanship if you don't know where the lines are. do we have an american line? would lead to more clearly define it. >> i think, you know, there are a couple of major reasons why in the credibility of military threat is so important. one reason is, sandy, i think it was, indicated cannot be aryans to respond to credible threats of force. you looked at the hostage crisis it was resolved when the ron reagan was elected. you read the biographies of the hostage-takers, they act like a cowboy. their release the hostages the mo
as the u.n. envoy to syria. with so much concern about the threat of chemical weapons at this point, do you think there are any diplomatic options left? >> i think the play -- and hillary clinton met twice today with russian foreign minister lavrov -- is to get russia in the tent with the rest of the world. everyone has predicted, when facts on the ground change, russia will be there. this could be a reset moment for vladimir putin, and he could, because of his unique sway in the area, persuade, i would think, the bashar family to step aside and create a peaceful transition, like the transition in yemen. the opposition is now more broadly representative, and i would hope the russians would see that being on the wrong side of this just creates more carnage, more opportunity for terrorists to get traction there and won't help russia. >> it's a pivotal moment, as we say, a clear tipping point. glad you're back safe and sound from egyp. jane harman, thanks so much for coming in. the jersey shore about to meet the fiscal cliff. grim news for governor christie as he visits washington. >>> plus th
much like to go in and agree with local jurisdictions and state, charity's a good example, but with n.y.u. and others in new york, there are seven hospitals we'll be looking at, just in one area. it would make a lot more sense to me that if we came up a design phase, that we'd come up with funding for the repairs. and then instead of doing that as a reimbursement project, once we agree to knows numbers, issue a final estimate. the problem is the act refers to only actual cost. and there's always been the issue, what happens if we do that type of a block grant based upon a design built phase, what happens if you have underages and overages and what happens to the applicant who may find more damages? it sounds like we didn't do an estimate, we're just doing the regular project worksheet. so i think we're going to need some additional guidance from congress as to how we do these types of estimates. what would happen to appeals, whether we need an arbitration? and also what happens to any funds that may remain after a project? would the applicant keep that? again, the savings to the federal g
the n.y.u.-stern school of business, the columbia university of international public affairs and foreign university. welcome to all your students. we're glad you're here. and now it is my great pleasure to introduce our speaker, sir mervyn king. he is governor of the bank of england and chairman of its monetary policy committee and the financial policy committee. he served as the bank of england back to 1990 when he became a non-executive director. from there, he became chief economist and executive director and deputy governor. he was appointed governor in 2003. prior to his bank of england service, he taught at the london school of economics, harvard, mit, a cambridge, and the university of birmingham. he studied at king's college, cambridge and was a cannady scholar at harvard. hearingok forward to when you have to share with us today. the podium is yours. [applause] >> thank you and good afternoon. it is our real honor to be invited to speak to this great club of yours, especially in front of such a distinguished audience today. it is a pleasure to be introduced by roger because we w
by attacking the u.s.? no. that was the reverse of what we would have faced if they had used the i.n.f. missiles to attack our allies in europe. we would be faced without the i. i.n.f. in europe to using our intercontinental and if effect committing suicide. so, everything was reversed by the deployment. i think what rick has said about the deployment is absolutely right. we had to deploy in order to show the soviets that their real interest was zero. now, of course, in reykjavik we were very close to agreeing and we have had agreed if gorbachev had not put conditions on 100 outside europe. whether we ever would have deployed 100 in alaska i doubt. but the problem from the russian point of view was that gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. and with 100 i.n.f. missiles directed at them how was he going to do that? it was not in their interests to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now we've access of records of politburo discussions. let me go back to a couple of words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev,
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